Woman holds breast cancer pink ribbon, pointing at it to encourage others to understand mammogram screening guidelines.

A Guide to Mammograms: What Age Do Mammograms Start, What Are Mammograms Like, and More

Firstly, we want to congratulate you on doing the necessary research to be ready for your mammogram! Yes, getting a mammogram for the first time is intimidating, but if you’ve successfully scheduled and overcome a pap smear, you are capable of anything.

Mammograms are used to detect early signs of breast cancer. Breast cancer is most treatable in its early stages, which is why preventative checks are so crucial for women. Mammograms are similar to getting an X-ray of your breast tissue. They allow doctors to physically see inside breasts to check out what, exactly, is happening in there. They’re especially useful because they really give the doctor everything they need to know - these days, mammograms capture even the most minute details, so they’re highly effective. Trust us, scheduling a mammogram is worth every woman’s time.

So, what’s the difference between a mammogram and an ultrasound?

An ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves that bounce off the tissues within our bodies, which a computer then converts to an image.

A mammogram, on the other hand, is a low-dose version of an X-ray, which is why metal plates are needed during the procedure. The electrodes released during the mammogram have to bounce off the surrounding metal to capture the image of the mammogram, showing healthcare providers any breast cancer or other breast diseases present. Sometimes, both mammograms and ultrasounds are used in tandem to help the doctor understand what is going on within the breast.

Ultrasounds are not a replacement for mammograms of breast cancer, but aid doctors in checking any abnormal areas found in patients with mammograms of dense breast tissue. They are used in addition to a mammogram, but never replace one entirely!

Nowadays, doctors will decide to administer one of three types of mammograms: film-screen mammography, digital mammography in 2D, and digital mammography in 3D.

What is digital mammography in 2D?

This practice takes two images of each breast and uses them to create a 2D image of each. It was standard practice until 2011.

What is digital mammography in 3D?

Also known as digital breast tomosynthesis, digital tomosynthesis, or just tomosynthesis, 3D digital mammography uses several images of each breast to create a detailed 3D image of the breast. This has become standard care for breast cancer after gaining approval from the FDA in 2011. Studies show that 3D digital mammography finds more cancers than the traditional 2D method and gives fewer false positives.

What is film-screen mammography?

This type of mammogram produces black-and-white images on film, takes a little more time to create, and was more commonly administered in the past.

Doctor listens to woman's heart with a stethoscope before her first mammogram.

What’s the age of the first mammogram in the U.S.?

The United States Preventative Services Taskforce recommends that women begin to regularly schedule screening mammograms at the age of 40. After, mammograms should be scheduled every one to two years for a breast check-up if there are no symptoms found.

When should I begin self-examining my breasts?

This is another crucial preventative step! And it’s a quick and simple process. Young women should begin self-examining their breasts as soon as they mature and their breasts stop growing, or around the age of 20. Read through this helpful guide on how to self-examine your breasts.

When women examine their breasts regularly beginning at a young age, they are more likely to discover any irregularities or changes before they develop into something more serious. Self-examination is another fantastic preventative practice all young women should include in their weekly schedules.

Waiting until the week after your period to conduct self-examinations is recommended to avoid any pain or abnormalities caused by hormone fluctuations and swelling.

When self-examining breasts, always look out for…

  • Lumps that are new, growing, or changing shape.
  • Swelling or thickening of a certain area or part of the breast or armpit.
  • Nipple abnormalities like reddening, flaking, pulling in, or discharge.
  • Pain that is sudden, irregular, or creates constant discomfort.
  • Changes in size that are sudden or seem out-of-the-blue, unrelated to hormonal fluctuations or periods.

If you discover any of these symptoms of breast cancer, reach out to your doctor or schedule a diagnostic mammogram with a doctor near you to check your breasts as soon as possible.

Take a closer look at mammogram screening guidelines.

So, whether it’s your first time getting a mammogram at age 40 or taking preventative steps and scheduling a diagnostic mammogram early,…

Doctor aids woman to get into correct position for her mammogram.Here’s Our Step-by-Step Guide to Your First Mammogram

Schedule a Mammogram Appointment:

  • Ask your doctor or do some research to find a reputable mammography facility or clinic in your area.
  • Call or register online to schedule an appointment.
  • Make sure they specialize in mammograms and have qualified radiologists!

Timing:

  • Avoid scheduling the appointment during the week before your period when your breasts may be more sensitive. Although mammograms are not invasive, pressure is applied to the breast which can create discomfort.

Clothing and Comfort:

  • We recommend wearing a two-piece outfit, as you'll need to undress from the waist up.
  • Avoid wearing deodorant, lotions, or powders on your upper body, as they can interfere with the imaging.

Communicate and Share:

  • Sharing your medical history, prior surgeries, or family history of breast cancer can help doctors provide the best care.
  • Always inform the technician if you have breast implants or have had any breast-related procedures or concerns.

How long do mammograms take?

  • Roughly 20 minutes!
  • You’ll be asked to undress from the waist up and will be given a gown to wear during the procedure.

The Procedure:

  • First, the technician will position your breast between two metal plates on the mammography machine.
  • Then, the plates will compress your breast for a few seconds to get the clearest images. While it may feel uncomfortable or slightly painful, it shouldn't be overly painful. Communicate any discomfort you feel to the technician.
  • Because mammograms usually involve two images of each breast taken from different angles, the technician may reposition your breast between images.

After the Procedure:

  • Once the images are taken, you'll be asked to wait while the technician ensures the images they captured are high-quality.
  • Once the quality of the images is confirmed, you can get dressed.

             Some women may experience mild bruising or temporary discomfort. This should subside quickly.

How long does it take to get mammogram test results?

  • You’ll receive your results within a few weeks after your radiologist interprets your mammogram and sends the results to your healthcare provider.

           Don't panic if you're called back for additional tests, as most callbacks do not indicate breast cancer.

What to Do Before and After a Mammogram:

  • Stay relaxed and take deep breaths before the procedure - always communicate discomfort and pain to your doctor!
  • Follow all instructions given to you by the mammography facility.
  • Afterward, continue to schedule regular mammogram screenings as recommended by your healthcare provider.
  • Know your mammogram schedule and never skip routine screenings.

What Not to Do Before and After a Mammogram:

  • Don't wear metallic accessories or clothing items, as they interfere with the mammogram images.
  • Try not to schedule your mammogram at a time when your breasts are likely to be sore or swollen to avoid discomfort.
  • Don't be afraid to ask questions and voice any concerns to your technician or radiologist.

We hope this guide on how to prepare for your first mammogram helps; that’s what we’re here for! At Pawsitively 4 Pink, our passion is providing direct financial support for local, underserved women fighting breast cancer. Please contact us to find out more about ways to help, or donate directly.


The Importance of Self-love in the Breast Cancer Journey

While one incredible aspect of your fight against cancer is realizing the mass quantity of people in your life that deeply love and care about you, radical self-love will be what buoys you through your cancer journey.

In many ways, the externally sourced love that our friends, family, and spouses provide is one of the most beautiful things we can experience. External love is highly sought after but comes in second place after true self-love. We can practice true self-love by taking the time to understand, nourish, and care for ourselves deeply, hence providing the courage, resilience, and positivity that help remedy breast cancer.

The breast cancer journey - from diagnosis to treatment and remission - is a winding path that only one person in your life will witness every second of. That’s you. Bearing witness to your illness, struggle, and eventually overcoming cancer altogether is you; body, mind, and soul. That’s why it's critical to give yourself the love you need, to treat every part of you with the same respect, diligence, and duty that you provide to those around you. Nourishing your body with the right food and drink, your mind with enriching books or entertaining TV shows, and your spirit with mindfulness or gratitude practice is exactly what will guide your recovery during all the highs and especially the lows.

A woman walks through a field of blooming sunflowers on a bluebird sky day, she seems to exude the essence of the importance of self-love.Self-compassion is bound to bloom

It’s easier said than done. Self-love can prove difficult for many, especially those who fall into the traditional female role; or those who have been the givers in our society rather than the receivers of selflessness and affection. It takes radical self-awareness and strength to turn that practice of giving around and, instead, aim it at ourselves. While it may be uncomfortable at first, getting used to practicing self-love provides us with the energy we need to make it through each day. There are a myriad of ways to explore and practice spiritually; from self-love affirmations, to self-love books, to even authoring a breast cancer blog that reflects on your journey and celebrates your achievements. A personal journal is another great way to let it all out - and there’s no need to be strictly positive here! Sometimes, the best way to feel heard is to let your deepest concerns and negative feelings out onto the page. Self-expression is essential to self-love; it’s important even on tougher days. Make space to listen to yourself.

Inspirational quotes about beating breast cancer and breast cancer affirmations may not be something you’ve appreciated in the past, but studies show that this intentional positivity brings self-awareness to the parts of ourselves that need it most. Many medical professionals believe that positivity affects everything from physical recovery after invasive surgeries to even lowering levels of pain and more. Many who receive their diagnosis have certain ideas regarding breast cancer. For example, some may think that the only person who is able to change the situation is the doctor, when it’s actually true that each sick individual has a certain power to shape their experience. So even if you’ve never tried it before, take a minute to say some of these self-love affirmations out loud to yourself. It’s even more helpful to repeat them while looking at yourself lovingly into a mirror. One of our favorites is “I bloom where I am planted. My roots have never been stronger.”

The silhouette of a woman practicing self-love and exercising with her arm outstretched while the sun rises behind her.Self-love sews the seeds of resilience

We strengthen our roots with self-love. Really paying attention to our needs, wants, and desires, and making sure those parts of ourselves feel heard is crucial because it’s what aids you in continuing to value yourself during such a tumultuous time. Valuing yourself in these moments when you may not feel as lovable as you once did is what builds resilience and tolerance for your lowest lows. Sometimes, knowing that you’re not alone in your experience is exactly the recognition, validation, and inspiration we need to keep going. 

Our founder Michelle shares her story here, about the realizations she had while witnessing her mother and close friends battle against cancer and the thoughtful advice she has for patients and survivors. One suggestion she has is to keep both your body and mind nourished with healthy foods. Maintaining a well-fuelled body while you fight a detrimental physical illness is one of the keys to staying positive; there is no line where the body ends and the other mind begins. Staying healthy physically is also the key to staying balanced mentally. You can find eight of her favorite recipes for fighters and survivors here.

Noteboard with the typed words SELF CARE ISN'T SELFISH, a guiding affirmation meant for those struggling with cancer.Becoming your own best friend

For some who struggle with self-love, it helps to imagine what you would say to or do for your best friend, or imagine that you are your own child. For many, it is easiest to show those closest to us unconditional love, and tapping into that feeling you have for your best friend, spouse, children, or parents is the most effective way to start to redirect that love back to yourself. Imagine seeing a loved one struggling the way you are and imagine what you would do for them. Maybe you would go to their house to watch their favorite movie and eat popcorn side by side, or make or buy them a small gift, or even bring them a bouquet of flowers. Now, try doing one of those things for yourself. 

Another similar tool for starting your self-love journey is keeping a list of the activities and things you really enjoy - chocolate molten lava cake, listening to Fleetwood Mac, lighting a candle and drawing a bath, taking your dog for a long walk - and intentionally choose to do one of those things for yourself every day. Loving yourself throughout your cancer journey will make you endlessly compassionate towards yourself on the hard days, and motivate you to stay positive on your good days. We at Pawsitively 4 Pink know firsthand that there is no better way to spend your time than loving yourself well; you are your best asset.


How can I afford breast cancer treatment?

This is a question that you shouldn’t have to worry about. 

Cancer is a life-altering and emotionally draining disease, and on top of all that, the cost of treatment can be very overwhelming. Many individuals and families struggle to afford breast cancer treatment and all the necessary medications, procedures, therapies, and aftercare that come with the illness. We understand how challenging this process can be, which is why we're here to provide guidance on finding financial support to meet your needs.

Let’s take a look at some commonly asked questions on breast cancer treatment as well as some options you may want to consider. 

Is Breast Cancer Treatment Expensive? 

The short answer is yes, unfortunately, it can be very expensive. Cancer patients have one priority: to get better. But, the reality is that the average cost of breast cancer treatment without insurance can range from $10,000 to $200,000, which is often more than the individual’s annual income. Even with health insurance, the out-of-pocket costs can still be expensive. Co-pays, co-insurance, and pre-deductible expenses can vary depending on your plan and the treatments required for your situation and type of breast cancer. With all these different factors, it’s impossible to estimate an exact cost until after consulting with a doctor about the potential options available.

Person calculating how to afford breast cancer treatmentIs There Any Financial Help for Breast Cancer Patients?

The good news is there are lots of organizations out there that want to help. Depending on your individual situation, you may qualify for grants or other forms of assistance from government programs like Medicare or Medicaid. You can also research local community resources such as churches, community centers, and charitable organizations. Many of them have programs specifically designed to provide affordable medical services and treatments otherwise unavailable due to economic status or location. Non-profits like Pawsitively 4 Pink offer support through grant programs that supply financial assistance for both treatments and living expenses to those who are affected by a breast cancer diagnosis. Be sure to research every option available to you – you don’t want to miss out on any potential sources of help. And please don't forget that you don't have to go through this alone. Seek compassionate and experienced professionals who will listen and guide you through the maze of options without judgment. 

If you don’t qualify for a grant or other form of aid, there are still other ways you can get help paying for breast cancer treatment. One option is to ask your doctor or medical provider if they will allow payment plans or discounts. In some cases, they may be willing to work with you on alternative arrangements if needed. Furthermore, most pharmaceutical companies have patient assistance programs that offer free or discounted medicines and treatments.

Women searching for help paying for breast cancer treatment onlineAffordable Cancer Treatment Options

If you’re still seeking more options, there are other alternative treatments for breast cancer patients. Even when funds are scarce, it doesn’t mean you should sacrifice quality care. While traditional healthcare may be too expensive for some people budget-wise, there are plenty of cheaper alternatives. Some people supplement their treatment with holistic healing methods like naturopathy or dietary supplements, self-care habits such as regular exercise, and stress reduction techniques. 

Clinical trials are another avenue you might explore if you’re worried about the cost of breast cancer treatment without insurance. Many trials offer financial benefits such as free tests and medications in exchange for participation in the program itself. Of course, it’s important to discuss alternative treatments with your doctor before pursuing them.

Close up of hands people holding hands while talking about affordable cancer treatmentHaving breast cancer can be a very overwhelming and frightening experience, but it’s important to remember that you don't have to face it alone. It’s okay to ask for help and support from your family, friends, and even community – they are there to help you during this difficult time! If you are worried about not being able to afford breast cancer treatment, remember that there are organizations that provide valuable resources like financial assistance, support groups, and even counseling services. No matter what lies ahead in your battle with cancer, try to keep positive thoughts in your mind and reach out for any help that you may need. If you have any more questions or would like to connect with members of our support group, please join us on Facebook, and don't hesitate to reach out. If you have any more questions or would like to connect with members of our support group, please don't hesitate to reach out. We wish you all the best on your journey to recovery!


How to Choose a Non-Profit to Donate to

Have you been looking for a way to give back to your community and make a positive impact? Supporting a non-profit organization is one of the best ways to do just that. Choosing where to donate to can be somewhat difficult and overwhelming, with so many great causes out there. There are more than 1.5 million non-profit organizations in the US alone! It’s important to understand the challenges of the non-profit world and how to navigate the process of choosing which one to donate to.

Between selecting a cause that aligns with your values, researching potential organizations, and determining how exactly you want your money to be spent, it might seem like you have your work cut out for you. But don’t let that deter you from making the right choice! We’re here to make this process as simple as possible. Join us as we walk through the important steps in finding the right fit for your financial contributions. Remember, no donation is too small!

Let’s clear up some misinformation…

The statistics used in relation to non-profit donations are often widely misconstrued. It’s not uncommon to hear numbers as high as 90% when it comes to what percentage of philanthropic dollars come from individual donors. For example, this 2019 report on sources of contributions for non-profits shows that 69% comes from individuals, 17% from foundations, 10% from bequests, and 5% from corporations. Remember that larger organizations skew this data significantly, and the numbers can look very different for smaller non-profits. More recent data on the non-profit economy shows that although 70% of charitable contributions are from individuals, their donations only make up 13% of total non-profit revenue. 

This deceptive claim that the majority of non-profit donations come from individuals does a massive disservice to small organizations. It’s easy to feel disheartened as a non-profit worker living under the impression that five-dollar donations will make up the large majority of your annual proceeds. It’s also important to note that this misinformation doesn’t include organizations that are led by marginalized communities that rely on foundations and government funding.

Deciding between small and large organizations

As far as donations go, it’s no secret that the majority of them go to large, well-known non-profits. In fact, they often seem to be the only organizations receiving funding. Smaller, local non-profits often get overlooked in favor of these larger entities due to size and awareness. As a result, the institutions with the most to give are less likely to donate money or resources to smaller organizations when selecting their beneficiaries. So in the case of medical non-profits, hospitals tend to donate exclusively to big-name organizations. Funders have the power to set the benchmark in a way, meaning other donors will often follow in their steps. 

Unfortunately, this means that many worthy causes don't receive the help they need from more prominent institutions. This is particularly true when it comes to breast cancer non-profit organizations like our own. The very nature of the mission limits our outreach capabilities compared to other organizations and thus it can be difficult to generate enough support and donations from those who have the power to provide financial assistance. 

The lack of attention given to smaller, local non-profits not only deprives these important programs of much-needed resources but also denies people access to potentially life-saving information or treatments. 

It’s important for individuals themselves as well as healthcare institutions alike to step up and show support for these organizations in order for them to continue their life-saving work. Donations don’t necessarily have to be monetary either. Time spent volunteering or spreading awareness can make just as much difference in helping these small charities achieve their goals and making a difference in someone’s life along the way.

Steps to finding your perfect match

Keeping that all in mind, when it comes to picking the best non-profit organization to donate to, it's important for individuals to take the time to research and evaluate their choices. Follow these steps to find an organization that aligns with your values and spends your funds wisely.

1. Select a cause

As a first step, it's crucial to select a cause that aligns with your values. Think about what matters most to you—whether it's environmental conservation, animal welfare, poverty alleviation, breast cancer support, or something else entirely—and look for an organization that is dedicated to educating the public and making progress on this issue.

2. Research potential organizations

Once you've identified an area of focus, you can now research potential organizations that specialize in this field. Use websites such as Charity Navigator and GuideStar to read reviews and get a comprehensive overview of the non-profits that could be a fit. It's also helpful to dive into the mission statement of each organization and get a better idea of how they're approaching their given mission. After doing some background research on these potential candidates, narrow down your list based on which ones you feel best align with your goals and values.

3. Determine how your dollar will be spent

Considering practical tips can also help individuals when choosing a non-profit organization. One thing we suggest is to spend some time looking into the financials of each organization. Although it’s not always the deciding factor for where donors should give their money, it’s important to have an idea of where funds are going within each individual charity. 

It’s also a good idea to make sure donations are exempt from taxes by ensuring that each non-profit is registered with the IRS as 501(c)(3) status. If you prefer giving locally, check out community foundations or United Way chapters for ideas in your area. 

4. Find out if your company will match your donation

Lastly, consider any possible donation-matching programs at work or in your community. Corporate matching gifts are a popular form of philanthropy in which companies financially match donations that their employees make to nonprofits. This type of charitable contribution by businesses allows them to show their support for charities, both large and small. When an employee chooses to donate, they can request that their employer match the donation, usually at a 1:1 ratio. However, some employers may choose to increase the match ratio to 2:1, 3:1, or even 4:1, depending on the cause and their financial capacities. 

Donating through corporate matching programs is an excellent opportunity for your dollar to go further and do more good in the world. The process is simple – after donating and submitting receipts from your donation transactions, you can contact your employer’s HR department and ask if they offer a corporate gift match policy. If so, you can request that they match your full or partial donation amount as applicable!

In all cases, picking a non-profit organization should take into account both personal values as well as practical considerations so that donors can make sure their contributions are having maximum impact on the cause they care most about. If you are able to make a donation of any size, pay it forward. You can make a true difference in this world!


Types of Breast Cancer

What are the Different Types of Breast Cancer?

Breast cancer affects millions of women around the world. While it is often thought of as a single type, there are actually many different types of breast cancer, each with its own unique set of symptoms and treatment options. With early detection and proper treatment, many women are able to fight it and go on to lead long and healthy lives.

It's important to get an accurate diagnosis from a qualified medical professional- sometimes even multiple, as second opinions in these cases are helpful. Once you know the type of breast cancer you have, your doctor will begin to develop a treatment plan that is tailored to your individual needs.

Additionally, doctors may also consider the genetic makeup of cancer when making a diagnosis. This classification is important because it helps doctors predict how cancer will respond to specific treatments. By understanding the different types of breast cancer, doctors can develop personalized treatment plans that are more likely to be effective.

Types of Breast CancerInvasive Breast Cancer vs. Noninvasive Breast Cancer

When most people think of breast cancer, they think of a tumor that is contained within the breast. However, cancer can also spread beyond the breast and into the surrounding tissue. This is known as invasive breast cancer. Invasive breast cancer occurs when the original tumor breaks through the wall of the duct or lobule and begins to grow into the surrounding tissue. Early detection is key to successful treatment and it is important to be aware of the signs and symptoms of invasive breast cancer so that you can seek medical help if necessary.

While non-invasive breast cancer is not as serious as invasive breast cancer, it is still important to seek treatment because it can progress to a more serious form of the disease. There are several types of non-invasive breast cancer, including Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) and Lobular Carcinoma in Situ (LCIS). Treatment for non-invasive breast cancer typically involves surgery to remove the abnormal cells. In some cases, radiation therapy or chemotherapy may also be recommended.

Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) is a condition in which abnormal cells are found in the lining of the breast milk duct. The atypical cells have not spread outside of the ducts into the surrounding breast tissue. DCIS is a highly treatable and very early cancer, but if it’s left untreated or undetected, it may spread into the surrounding breast tissue. DCIS is usually found on a mammogram and appears as small calcium deposits in the ducts.

Although DCIS doesn't typically cause any signs or symptoms, it can sometimes lead to the development of a breast lump or bloody nipple discharge. DCIS is usually discovered during a routine mammogram when it appears as small clusters of calcifications that have irregular shapes and sizes. If you notice any changes in your breasts, it's important to see a doctor for further evaluation. While DCIS itself is not life-threatening, it can increase your risk of developing invasive breast cancer if left untreated. If you have DCIS, it’s important to talk to your doctor about your treatment options. Treatment for DCIS may include surgery, radiation therapy, or hormone therapy. In some cases, no treatment is necessary if the DCIS is found early and isn’t causing any symptoms.

Invasive Ductal Carcinoma 

If you have been diagnosed with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC), it means that cancer started in the milk ducts of your breast. The good news is that IDC is the most common type of breast cancer, so you are not alone. In fact, about 80% of all breast cancers are IDC. Treatment for IDC typically involves surgery to remove the cancerous tissue, followed by radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. With early detection and proper treatment, the prognosis for IDC is generally very good. So if you have been diagnosed with IDC, be sure to talk to your doctor about your treatment options and make a plan that is right for you. Invasive Ductal Carcinoma typically affects people over the age of 55. However, transwomen are more likely to develop breast cancer than cisgender men, while transmen are less likely to develop breast cancer than cisgender women. 

Your healthcare professional will usually check for lumps in the breast tissue. Lumps can be benign or malignant, so it's important to have them assessed by a qualified medical practitioner. Your healthcare professional might also check for swollen lymph nodes beneath your arms, as these can sometimes be an indication of breast cancer. They will be able to advise you on the best course of action. It's important to have regular screenings for breast cancer, especially if you're at high risk. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) is often detected during routine mammograms, and if your doctor suspects you may have IDC, they may also conduct additional tests, like an MRI or ultrasound. A biopsy may also be necessary to remove a small sample of breast tissue for further analysis. Screenings are crucial because they can help catch IDC early when it's most treatable. Treatment for IDC typically includes surgery, radiation therapy, and/or chemotherapy. With early detection and treatment, this can be successfully managed.

Types of Breast CancerInvasive Lobular Carcinoma

Invasive Lobular Carcinoma (ILC) is a type of breast cancer that starts in the lobules, which are the glands in the breast that produce milk. ILC is the second most common type of breast cancer, accounting for about 10% of all invasive breast cancers. ILC is often mistaken for other types of breast cancer because it can appear similarly on mammograms. However, ILC tends to grow more diffusely, and it is often not palpable on physical examination. In addition, ILC is more likely to be associated with certain genetic mutations, such as those in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Treatment for ILC generally follows the same principles as a treatment for IDC and includes surgery, radiation therapy, and/or chemotherapy. Early detection is key to the successful treatment of ILC, so it is important for women to be familiar with the signs and symptoms of this disease.

Unlike other types of breast cancer, which often cause a distinct lump to form, invasive lobular carcinoma typically grows larger and causes more diffused changes in the breast. In some cases, an area of thickening or fullness may be noticeable in the breast. The skin over the breast may also change texture or appearance, it will be dimpled or thickened and the nipple may become inverted. As with other types of breast cancer, it is important to consult a doctor if you notice any changes in your breasts. 

Lobular Carcinoma in Situ and Atypical Lobular Hyperplasia

Lobular Carcinoma in Situ (LCIS) is non-invasive breast cancer that begins in the milk-producing lobules of the breast. Although its name suggests otherwise, LCIS is not true breast cancer and does not spread beyond the lobules where it starts. In fact, LCIS is not even considered a precancerous condition, as it does not increase a woman's risk of developing invasive breast cancer. However, LCIS may be found in conjunction with other breast abnormalities, such as atypical hyperplasia, which can increase a woman's risk of developing breast cancer. For this reason, women with LCIS should be sure to undergo regular Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) screenings. The BCSC recommends that women with LCIS have a clinical breast exam every six months and a mammogram every year. If you have been diagnosed with LCIS, or think you may be at risk, talk to your doctor about the best course of action for you.

Inflammatory Breast Cancer

Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is a type of breast cancer that often causes the breast to become red, swollen, and inflamed. This is a rare but aggressive form of the disease. Its symptoms are different from those of other types of breast cancer, and it tends to spread quickly. Cancer cells block lymphatic vessels in your breast, causing the skin to thicken or discolor breast skin with tiny dimples, puckers, or ridges that make it look like an orange peel. In addition to these physical changes, you may also experience fatigue, itching, pain, and a burning sensation in your breast.

Early detection is key, so it is important to be aware of the signs and symptoms of this type of cancer. If you notice any changes in your breasts, see a doctor right away. Prompt treatments are available that can improve the prognosis. Chemotherapy is often used to reduce the size of the tumor before surgery, and radiation therapy is often used after surgery to remove any remaining cancerous cells. While IBC is an aggressive form of cancer, with proper treatment many patients can recover and live long and healthy lives.

Types of Breast CanceerBreast Sarcoma

Breast Sarcoma is challenging to detect in its early stages because it does not usually cause a lump or change in the appearance of the breast and is generally found during a routine mammogram or self-breast exam. However, if the tumor begins to grow, it can cause pain and swelling. 

Breast Sarcomas are a type of cancer that can either be primary or secondary tumors. A primary tumor originates in the breast, while a secondary tumor has spread from another part of the body. Some inherited genetic disorders are known to increase one's risk of developing a primary breast sarcoma, but the cause is often unknown. Secondary tumors can develop after radiation therapy, chronic lymphedema, certain chemicals, some forms of chemotherapy, and immune system diseases. While breast sarcoma is rare, it is important to be aware of the symptoms, the most common sign is a lump or mass that can be felt under the skin. These lumps are usually painless, but they may cause discomfort if they press on nearby nerves or blood vessels. Sarcoma may also cause bone pain, either as a result of the tumor pressing on the bone or from cancer cells causing the bone to break down. Other signs and symptoms of sarcoma include abdominal pain and weight loss. If you experience any of these symptoms, it is important to see a doctor.

Metaplastic Carcinoma

Metaplastic Carcinoma is a rare and aggressive type of breast cancer that is characterized by the presence of two or more types of cancer cells. Compared to other types of breast cancer, metaplastic breast cancer is faster growing and more likely to metastasize, or spread, to other parts of the body. This unique cancer is often difficult to diagnose and treat, as it can contain elements of both carcinoma and sarcoma. However, recent advances in genetic analysis have allowed doctors to better understand the biology of metaplastic carcinoma and develop targeted treatments. 

While metaplastic breast cancer is serious, patients should remember that they are not alone. There are many support groups and resources available to help patients through every step of their journey.

Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer and Progesterone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

There are several types of breast cancer, and each type is characterized by the presence of specific receptors on the surface of the cancer cells. Estrogen and progesterone are two hormones that can fuel cancer growth. Cells from your breast cancer can be tested for receptors on these hormones. Breast cancer can contain receptors for one of these hormones, both, or neither. 

Estrogen receptor-positive means that the hormone can attach to the receptor and potentially stimulate the cancer cells to grow. However, not all breast cancers are fueled by hormones. If your breast cancer is hormone receptor-positive, you may be treated with hormone therapy, which is a type of treatment that works by lowering the number of hormones in the body or blocking the action of hormones on breast cancer cells. 

Another type of breast cancer, known as progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer, is sensitive to the hormone progesterone. This means that the cancer cells have receptors that allow them to use progesterone to grow. Endocrine therapy is a treatment that blocks the growth of cancer cells by preventing them from using hormones like progesterone. In the case of progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer, endocrine therapy can be an effective treatment option.

Types of Breast CancerHER2-Positive Breast Cancer

HER2-Positive Breast Cancer tends to be more aggressive than other types of breast cancer, but it is also more responsive to treatment that targets the HER2 protein. There are no unusual symptoms or risk factors associated with this type of cancer, although some studies suggest that it is more common among younger women under 40 years. Ultimately, HER2-positive breast cancer is a serious condition that requires prompt treatment. However, with the right treatment plan, it is possible to achieve remission and enjoy a good quality of life.

Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Triple-Negative Breast Cancers are classified as such because they lack receptors for estrogen, progesterone, and HER2. It is more aggressive and harder to treat than other types of breast cancer because they don’t respond to drugs that target estrogen, progesterone, or HER2 receptors. Women with triple-negative breast cancer are mainly treated with chemotherapy or take part in clinical trials. Studies show that genetic mutations are more common in women with triple-negative breast cancer, even if they don’t have any family history of breast cancer. If you have triple-negative breast cancer, talk to your doctor about genetic counseling and testing for hereditary forms of breast cancer, such as those linked to the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and other genetic mutations. Knowing if you have a genetic mutation helps your doctors determine the best course of treatment for you.

Breast Papilloma

Breast papillomas, also known as intraductal papillomas, are small, wartlike growths that can occur in the milk ducts of the breast. Although ductal papillomas are not cancerous, they can increase the risk of developing breast cancer if left untreated. It can cause a clear or bloody discharge from the nipple, or you may feel a small lump behind or next to the nipple. In some cases, multiple papillomas may be present, which has been linked to a higher risk of developing breast cancer. However, having a single papilloma does not appear to raise the risk of breast cancer. Treatment for breast papillomas typically involves removing the growths surgically. In some cases, radiation therapy may also be recommended.

Types of Breast Cancer

The chance of developing breast cancer increases with age and with certain lifestyle choices, such as drinking alcohol, being overweight or obese, not exercising, and taking hormone replacement therapy. Treatment for breast cancer may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or targeted therapy. The type of treatment depends on the stage of cancer and the person's wishes. After you know your type of breast cancer, it’s important to ask your doctor what that means for your outlook and what treatments are available each with its prognosis and treatment plan. Don’t be afraid to ask questions and get a second opinion if you need one. With the right information and support, you can fight breast cancer head-on. 

Women often feel isolated and confused when they are newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Connecting with other women who have been through this same experience can help you feel supported and less lonely in such difficult times.


I Found a Lump in My Breast...Now What?

You’re in front of your dresser and your hand runs through your chest. You feel something and just to be certain, you touch your breast again and this time, you’re sure that you felt a lump. Most women self-examine their breasts and once they find a lump, they freeze. Now the question is, what do you do when this happens?

First and foremost, don’t panic. Research shows that 85%  of breast lumps are benign, which means they are noncancerous, especially in women who haven’t yet hit 40. Women over 40 are normally encouraged to have regular mammograms and if those mammograms always turn negative, the odds are even higher that the lump you felt isn’t cancerous.

According to most obstetricians, before a palpable lump appears on a woman’s breast, something will already have been detected during a mammogram screening. Despite most women knowing this, the worrying and stress it has not stopped anyone from worrying once they feel a lump. The only way to be sure is to differentiate between a benign lump and a breast cancer lump.

Understanding your breasts

Your breasts consist of fat, blood vessels, nerves, glandular tissue, fibrous connective tissue, ducts, and milk-producing lobules. All these make your breasts quite lumpy. The major difference between a benign lump and a cancerous lump is that a benign one is fluid-filled and rolls between your fingers. A cancerous lump is normally hard and feels stuck in one place.

The other difference has to do with pain. Breast cancer, in most cases, doesn’t cause pain. Inflammatory breast cancer is an exception to this, as it comes with symptoms of aching or burning in the breast. Benign conditions might also be accompanied by painful symptoms, but at times, this isn’t the case.

The only sure way to know the nature of a breast lump is via medical tests such as a mammogram, fine needle aspiration, or ultrasound. These tests should be done at a medical facility that has all the equipment and with experts who can read the results.

Understanding the tests

What is a mammogram?

An X-ray examination of the breast is referred to as a mammogram. It is a process used to detect breast diseases or any breast problems, such as nipple discharge, lumps, or pain. This procedure enables the detection of benign tumors, cysts, and breast cancers before they can be detected via touch. All women are encouraged to frequently do a mammogram, whether or not they have breast health-related issues.

There are factors or conditions that may affect your mammogram results, such as

  • Having had a previous breast surgery
  • Hormonal breast changes
  • Deodorant, lotions, creams, or talcum powder applied on breasts or under the arms
  • Breast implants; these prevent the complete visualization of the breast area, hence hiding tissue

You should inform your medical examiner if any of these apply to you so that they can make the required preparations.

How to prepare yourself for a mammogram

The first thing is scheduling a date for the mammogram. It is advisable to do this two weeks before your period starts because breasts do become tender a week before and during menstruation. Once again, if you have breast implants, please notify the facility when scheduling the exam.

Expectant mothers or those who think they might be pregnant should consult a medical doctor before scheduling a mammogram. Discuss all options with your doctor. If you are breastfeeding, you should mention this to the mammography technician.

Avoid using lotion, perfume, deodorant, or powder on the day of the examination. Note that you'll have to remove clothes from the waist up, so wear something that you can easily get out of. It is also advisable to leave all jewelry and valuables at home. The health care provider or technologist will request other specific preparation based on your medical condition.

What is a fine-needle aspiration or FNA?

There are situations where a mammogram can’t prove that a certain body area is cancerous even though there are high chances that it is. In such situations, the tissue will be extracted via a needle for biopsy. The tissue will then be scrutinized under a microscope to determine if it is cancer or not.

FNA is just one of the several breast biopsy procedures as the type of biopsy done depends on the size and location of the breast lump.

How to prepare yourself for a biopsy

The entire procedure should be explained to you by the technologist and you should ask all the questions you might have. A consent form will be provided, but you should go through it carefully before signing anything. Once again, seek clarification on points that you don’t understand.

If your breast is numbed using local anesthesia and you are awake, then you don’t have much preparation. If general anesthesia will be used to put you into a deep sleep, then you will have to fast before the surgery. Your surgeon will explain everything before the procedure.

Once again, apply nothing to your breast or underarms. Inform your healthcare provider if you suspect you could be pregnant or you are pregnant. You should also inform them of any allergies. Perhaps you could be allergic to latex or anesthesia. You should also let them know if you are on any medication or taking supplements. This is also the time to say if you have a history of bleeding disorders.

Since you will be drowsy and groggy after, ensure that someone is on standby to drive you home.

What is an ultrasound?

When sound waves are used to examine your breasts, we refer to the method as a breast ultrasound. It will help the medical examiner spot any issues and also see how well blood flows to your breast areas. Ultrasounds are normally used when there is a change that fails to show up in a mammogram.

A breast ultrasound is not normally used to detect breast cancer, the reason being that it may fail to detect some early signs. For example, one early cancer sign it might not detect is micro-calcifications, which are small calcium deposits. So in what cases are an ultrasound method used?

  • When the breast tissue is really dense and the mammogram cannot see through it
  • When pregnant. Ultrasound doesn’t make use of radiation like mammography.
  • You are below 25 years of age
  • When there is a need to look at the surrounding lymph nodes. This is essential when removing cyst fluid or guiding a needle during a biopsy.
  • The health provider may recommend other reasons

How to prepare yourself for an ultrasound

Your healthcare service provider should explain the entire procedure to you. Don’t be afraid to ask all the questions that you may have. There are situations where you might be given a consent form to sign before the test. It is important that you go through the form carefully and ask for clarification when something is not clear.

There is no need to stop eating or drinking before the test. Just relax and please, don’t take any medicine for it. Breathe easy. Once again, avoid putting lotion, deodorant, or any other substances on your breasts that day. You should also wear clothes you can easily take off and that allow the technologist to easily examine your chest area. Some gel will be applied to your skin during the test. Follow any other instructions as required during the test.

Information is power, so when you feel a lump on your breast, seek medical advice as ll breast lumps should be evaluated by a medical professional. Once the cause of the lump is established, treatment can begin. So, finding a lump on your breast is not always a cause for alarm, it is a cause for taking the right action.

If you’d like to help make a difference in the lives of women experiencing breast cancer, you volunteer with us a Pawsitively 4 Pink or make a small donation.


How to Be There for a Loved One With Breast Cancer

Introduction

When someone you know is diagnosed, the first question is usually how to be there for a loved one with breast cancer. It can be hard to believe that this has happened since it’s not something that most people expect or plan to happen.

Breast cancer comes without warning, and it varies widely in how it impacts each individual diagnosed. However, if you think your reaction is sudden and shocking to hear that a loved one has been diagnosed, think about how they are feeling.

This article will encourage you to shift your perspective and motives to educate yourself on being there for a loved one with breast cancer. Although the diagnosis will affect you, it’s important to think about your loved one’s needs and how you can be your best for them.

The Power of Listening

One of the best things you can do for a loved one is to be there for them and approach every conversation with open ears. Just being there and listening can make all the difference. 

Many people feel isolated and scared after their diagnosis. They may feel confused and afraid to express what they are truly feeling and going through. By going into every conversation with open ears, you are fostering an environment that is safe for them to express themselves and put their trust in you.

Even if you don’t completely understand what they are trying to express or explain, it’s important to listen and validate their experiences. For example, if your loved one is saying that she doesn’t know how her spouse or children will handle this news, let her know you see where she is coming from and validate her experience. It is scary, and try to assure her she and her doctors will do everything they can to fight this thing. 

A general rule of thumb is to listen first,  talk second. This leads us to our next point…

Only Give Advice When Asked

Along with entering each conversation with open ears, try to have an open mind, heart, and perspective as well. Don’t be so quick to give advice unless asked. Though your intentions may be good, it’s important to understand that not everyone wants or needs advice.

Your loved one may be in the early stages of their diagnosis and not have any idea what to do next. In this case, they will likely want and need your help figuring out their options. However, if they are farther along in their cancer journey, they may not want or need any advice, just love, and support. 

The keywords here are “when asked.” It’s okay to share your perspective and experiences as they relate to the diagnosis, but wait for your loved one to ask for help—or at least express that they want it. This will help to avoid any tension or feelings of being overwhelmed on their part.

Of course, you want to support your loved one in any way you can. Do your research… but don’t overdo it. Instead, do something tangible like dropping off a meal or picking up their child for school. This is where you will really be needed.

Support Your Loved One’s Treatment Decisions

One of the most important things you can do as a supporter is to support your loved one’s treatment decisions. This includes everything from surgery to different therapies.

It can be difficult to make these decisions, and it’s perfectly understandable for you to have mixed feelings about them. However, it’s important that you do not voice unsolicited opinions unless you are asked for your opinion or advice.

You have to remember your loved one is going through the recovery process more than once. The treatment itself is one version of pain they have to go through, but they also have to go through it before the treatment itself, as well as after when they are waiting in remission.

Every time they have to weigh all their options, go over the timetable of the procedure or talk to their doctors, they are going through the process all over again.

So, try to support them throughout it all. Their lives have been turned upside down, and the last thing they need is judgment from the people they love. Understand that you would maybe not make the same decisions as your loved one, but that does not mean they have not chosen the best option for them.

Check-In Regularly, Not Just When Asked for

One of the most important responsibilities you have is to check in with your loved one. On a regular basis. This can be done via phone calls, text messages, cards, visits—anything that helps them know they are on your mind.

Doing this will let them know they are not alone during their recovery process. Many patients feel that their loved ones don’t check in beyond the initial diagnosis. This leaves them feeling alone and isolated. The hardest time for those with a cancer diagnosis is actually in the months following when the initial shock has worn off, and their loved ones get back to their daily lives. 

So, make sure you are checking in regularly to offer comfort and support. Moreover, your loved one may need this more often if their treatment is causing significant side effects or making them feel ill for an extended period of time.

Doing a service or an act of love at least once a week can provide quick reassurance that things are okay and they are not forgotten. So reach out to them. As much as you can.

Educate Yourself 

Lastly, but equally important, educate yourself on your loved one’s treatment. If you are like most people, cancer didn’t cross your mind much before your loved one was diagnosed.

So, take the time to learn about their type of cancer, the various treatments, what to expect during and after treatment, and so on. The more you know, the better equipped you’ll be to support your loved one emotionally and practically.

This includes being there for them when they have appointments, being able to answer any questions they may have, and just being a listening ear.

If you can be there and sit in on doctor’s visits and take notes for your loved one, this would be a fantastic way to offer support. Not only will you be helping them, but you will gain a better understanding for yourself as well.

Conclusion

There is no best way to support a loved one with cancer. However, there are many things you can do (or not do) that will help your loved one feel less alone and more supported throughout their journey.

When offering to be there for them, it’s important to remember they may need different types of support at various times. So, be sure to communicate with them and ask what they need from you specifically.

Most importantly, be there for them in whatever way possible and let them know you love them. Even if it gets difficult at times, just know your support goes a long way. If you or a loved one need another person in your support group, any aid in the breast cancer journey, or you would like to give something to help those with breast cancer, feel free to head over to Pawsitively 4 Pink. We have been able to help many women through their breast cancer journey through generous donations from our community. We are here for your loved one too.

 


Holistic Therapies That Can Provide Side Effect Relief for Breast Cancer Treatments

Most side effects of breast cancer treatments are known to be harsh, unpleasant, taxing, and scary. Because of this, some people have wondered if there are other options to treat cancer that would take less of a toll on their body, mind, and emotions.

Although there are many holistic therapies out there, they are not proven to be effective treatments against breast cancer by themselves. However, for some people, these holistic therapies have shown to be effective in providing relief for the side effects of conventional breast cancer treatment.

If you or a loved one are considering using any other remedies that your doctor has not spoken to you about, we recommend doing so first. In addition, it is important to note that although these holistic remedies have been shown to help some, holistic remedies can be harmful to some people in certain circumstances. 

Most doctors recommend you seek out standard medical treatment first, these natural treatment options should be included in a well-thought-out plan. Complementary therapies are extremely important but work best when coupled with traditional treatment plans as well.  However, we never intend to provide medical advice, so please speak with your doctor about what is best for you! 

Not only are we here to help you in your consideration of holistic therapies, but we are also here to provide you with assistance in obtaining the proper care using holistic therapies – more on that in a bit. For now, let’s get into some of the holistic therapies that can improve some of the side effects of breast cancer treatment. 

Aromatherapy

Aromatherapy is centered around the use of fragrant oils. This remedy is great because you can alter the process according to your own likes and dislikes. You can also choose whether you want the therapy to be performed by a practitioner or to use it on your own.

If you want to go the practitioner route, you can get a massage. Those with breast cancer choose to inhale the scents through your nose and have the oils rubbed on your body throughout the massage. 

If you want to have more control over the aromatherapy, you can choose how you want to use it. You can add the oils to a bath or simply inhale the scents through your nose in your own space. In addition, you can add in another therapy, such as performing meditation while inhaling the oils.

Aromatherapy can help provide relief in many ways, such as relieving nausea, stress, and pain. It can also help you work through anxiety, depression, and high blood pressure.

This therapy is a safe practice, but it’s best to find which oils and scents work best for you. It is important to note that some oils can cause allergic reactions if applied to your skin, so it is best to perform a skin test with any new oils.

Because some breast cancers are estrogen sensitive, one should be extra cautious when applying lavender oil and tea tree oil to your body and avoid using large amounts. Before moving forward with this remedy, we strongly advise you to consult your doctor first. This is not a cancer treatment, but a remedy.

Music Therapy

You may think you need to be musically inclined to this therapy, but that is not the case. The goal of music therapy is to give yourself a space to relax and let your mind wander somewhere else other than the many stressors in life, especially breast cancer. 

Music therapy consists of playing instruments, listening to music, and songwriting. This is another remedy you can choose to perform with an instructor or by yourself, or even in a group. 

With an instructor, you will work with a certified music instructor, which medical centers usually have on staff. They will guide you through activities tailored to your goals and the needs of each session.

By yourself, you can just let yourself unwind and use music however it will best help you. Within a group setting, you might discuss what the lyrics in songs mean to you or create a song together.

This therapy can help increase one’s mood, reduce anxiety, relieve pain, control nausea and vomiting, and allow someone to express themselves differently from putting their feelings into words.

There are no real risks associated with music therapy. However, we recommend finding a certified music therapist who is experienced working with people with breast cancer.

Massage Therapy

Massage therapy has been proven to give significant benefits to women with breast cancer. It can reduce anxiety, depression, nausea, vomiting, and breast cancer-related fatigue. according to a number of peer-reviewed studies, one of them being conducted at the University of Minnesota in 2003. 

In the study, patients showed increased levels of dopamine. This chemical in the brain helps produce a feeling of happiness. Additionally, there was even found to be an increase in white blood cells in the cancer patients who received massages versus those who didn’t. White blood cells are the body’s natural defense against threats.

There is even a massage therapy that only requires a light touch. This type of therapy is perfect for women who are looking for alternative medicine to reduce pain but are still sensitive to cancer pain. This natural treatment also allows for a sort of spiritual healing as well. 

If someone has just finished surgery after breast cancer, doctors will recommend only massaging the front of the body until after a full recovery. However, doctors still recommend this treatment to relieve pain. Deep massage should never be used on someone going through radiation or chemotherapy treatments. 

Progressive Muscle Relaxation 

Another example of a remedy for cancer pain is progressive muscle relaxation. This treatment involved the gradual releasing and tensing of focused areas of the body. Quality of life will dramatically improve and patients can expect to reduce cancer pain. 

There is no specialized licensing or certification to these alternative treatments. However, many health care professionals have had progressive muscle relaxation training. Its health benefits are tremendous, and it is recommended for both breast cancer survivors and to treat breast cancer. 

Tai Chi

Although tai chi is an exercise, it consists of slow and graceful movements with an emphasis on deep breaths and meditation.

This therapy is best done with an instructor but with today’s technology, you can easily find videos online from various instructors. You can find a group to perform this with in person, or you can perform it in the comfort of your own space with a pre-recorded video. In addition, there are also books that guide you.

There are no prerequisites to the shape or health you have to be in to perform tai chi, as all the movements can be tailored to your abilities.

Because of the slow movements, you’re given plenty of space and time to concentrate on meditating. This practice can help increase your strength, balance, flexibility, heart and lung functions, overall mood, and relieve stress.

Tai chi is relatively safe, as long as you listen to your body and mind. If something is painful or most of your body feels weak one day, it might be best to sit out and not perform tai chi until you feel capable.

As always, we recommend consulting your doctor before beginning tai chi. You should especially discuss this with your doctor if you have any joint problems, if you had recent surgery, or if you haven’t exercised in a while.

Journaling

Journaling is a great therapy practice because you have complete control, and it can also help you express your feelings during this tough time instead of keeping them in.

To journal, all you have to do is write down whatever you want. Usually, people write down accounts of their life, experiences, thoughts, and feelings. But there are so many other options, such as writing down positive affirmations each day, writing five positive interactions you have had recently, or writing about your future dreams.

Journaling is a great thing to do, either right when you wake up or before you go to bed. You are able to put your mind towards a specific focus to start or end your day, or both! Getting in tune with your feelings and journaling can provide you with a greater sense of emotional well-being and overall just feel better.

Journaling causes no harm and is worth a try. However, if journaling starts to feel like a chore to you, you might want to consider trying a different therapy. In addition, if you find yourself only journaling about negative thoughts, you may want to find something else that will be able to reduce your stress instead.

Conclusion

Every single person’s life and experiences are completely different. So there will never be the same right answer for everyone. Receiving a cancer diagnosis is an unimaginable thing for anyone, however, with treatment, it can be overcome. Whether someone with breast cancer chooses conventional treatment or alternative therapies, there are ways to overcome it. 

Finding a holistic therapy that works for you while you’re going through breast cancer treatment can provide the relief you never thought you could receive. A lot of medical centers provide opportunities for their patients to take part in remedies such as the ones listed above.

If you are interested in trying one of these therapies but don’t have the means or access to them, please feel free to reach out to us. We are dedicated to helping those battling breast cancer pay for treatments and remedies of all kinds. 

The only thing Pawsitively4Pink cares about is if it will provide some sort of relief to you. We hope you enjoyed learning about some holistic therapies that can give side effect relief for breast cancer. 

As stated before, always consult with your doctor before making any changes in your treatment. If you are looking for support to fund your holistic treatments or any kind of treatment, please reach out to us. We would love to see if we can help.